Free College Bible Courses

Christian Leaders College offers free Bible Courses on a variety of Bible study subjects. Take these courses for the Christian Leaders College program or the Christian Leaders Alliance licensed or ordained clergy program.

These free courses are accessed at the Christian Leaders Learning site. For college credit, you will need to enroll in and complete the Christian Leaders College Admissions Class and be accepted as a student. Then you can check out the different options for you to pursue.

Bible subjects include:

  • Bible Survey Courses
  • Books of the Bible
  • Biblical Theology and Interpretation
  • Preaching
  • Biblical Greek

The Free College Bible Courses at Christian Leaders College features some noted professors of the Bible. Dr. David Feddes, our college academic officer, teaches classes and leads many distinguished professors of Bible such as:

  • Dr. Ted Hildebrand
  • Professor Rev. Don Ritsman
  • Dr. Craig Keener
  • Dr. Jeff Weima
  • Professor Rev. Ray Vander Laan
  •  And more.

The Bible courses are in-depth formal training courses from the perspective that the Bible is the Word of God.

Free College Bible Courses

Old Testament Survey (3 credits)

This ministry training course examines the historical writings of the Old Testament, focusing on the stories of God’s dealings with Israel in preparation for the coming of Jesus Christ. The class also shows some applications for contemporary Christian living and preaching (The Old Testament’s detailed laws, Psalms, wisdom writings, and prophets are featured in other classes).

Outcomes:

  1. Know major events, identify significant characters, and recognize key themes in Old Testament history.
  2. Trace the progressive unfolding of God’s revelation in the history of salvation leading up to Jesus.
  3. Understand and explain the relevance of Old Testament history for knowing God and following Jesus today.
  4. See helpful examples of how sermons based on Old Testament history can glorify God, focus on Christ, and apply to people today.

New Testament Survey (3 credits)

This class explores God’s Word in the New Testament, paying particular attention to literary, historical, and theological dimensions.

Outcomes:

  1. Encounter God’s entire New Covenant revelation in Christ by reading every New Testament book.
  2. Know major theological themes in the New Testament as a whole.
  3. Know the setting and major emphases of each New Testament book.
  4. Trace the expansion of Christianity in the first century and the doctrinal understanding of the earliest Christians.
  5. Understand and embrace how Jesus saves, how the Holy Spirit transforms people, and how Christians live in a way that pleases God.

The Book of Acts (3 credits)

The Book of Acts describes the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, the launching of the early church, and the international spread of the gospel. In this class, world-renowned scholar Craig Keener offers the fruit of his vast research on Acts. His many books include Acts: An Exegetical Commentary (4,640 pages), the most thorough study of Acts ever written. This course is offered in partnership with Biblical eLearning.

Outcomes:

  1. Study the historical and literary features of the Book of Acts
  2. Develop an in-depth understanding of the story of the Book of Acts
  3. Become familiar with some major characters in the Book of Acts
  4. Learn about some findings of archeology connected with the Book of Acts
  5. See how the work of the Holy Spirit in Acts continues in our time.

Biblical Wisdom (4 credits)

This ministry training course examines the wisdom writings of Old Testament sages and poets: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, and Lamentations. The class shows the relevance of Old Testament wisdom for knowing God’s wisdom in Christ and following Jesus today.

Outcomes:

  1. Read and become familiar with Old Testament wisdom books and selected Psalms.
  2. Understand the theological framework and the central message of each wisdom book.
  3. Know various types of Psalms: lament, curse, praise, instruction, royal, thanks, and confidence.
  4. Recognize some literary techniques of Hebrew poetry.
  5. Understand that Jesus is the source and focus of all wisdom.
  6. Discern how Old Testament wisdom informs and guides Jesus’ followers today.

Hermeneutics and Exegesis (3 credits)

This ministry training course deals with key issues in how to interpret the Bible. Students learn basic elements for studying a passage and practice using methods to become more skilled in understanding biblical passages and preparing sermons.

  Outcomes:

  1. View the Bible as God’s message communicated by human authors in human language in a particular historical and cultural setting.
  2. Depend on the Holy Spirit while using sound methods of interpretation.
  3. Interpret Scripture with careful attention to grammatical, literary, historical, and theological elements.
  4. Use online research tools to aid accurate biblical interpretation.
  5. Depend on sound exegesis of Scripture as the basis for one’s theological positions and preaching.

Preaching, Preparation, and Presentation (3 credits)

Overview
This three-credit preaching course helps you learn to preach effectively. There are many elements to making great sermons. The most important is a sermon that comes out of the truth of your walk with God through the power of the Holy Spirit! Another element is the work of actually putting together the message. There is an art and there is a method to this practice.

This class looks at the art and method of preaching, preparation, and presentation of effective sermons and/or formal Christian-message presentations.

Outcomes

1. Learn how to study the Bible in a way that will lead to sermons reflecting the truth that you learn.

2. Develop a pattern of sermon making that uses the skills taught to prepare interesting and attention-getting introductions, organize the body of the sermon in a memorable way, and to conclude your message with power.

3. Embrace your role and calling as a preacher as you understand where and how were called, and also the tremendous responsibility that we preachers have.

4. Recognize that the called preacher must relate effectively to the congregation where he/she preaches.  Several examples are given on how to do this.

5. Reflect on some of the practical issues of preaching, like preaching through pain, and preaching when people aren’t responding.

Sermon Construction and Presentation (4 credits)

This preaching class will strengthen your preaching as you learn the basics of communication, study how to prepare and preach sermons, and watch a variety of preachers and teachers in action.

Outcomes:

  1. Pursue preaching as Scripture-based, Christ-centered proclamation of God’s message for people today.
  2. Grasp and apply elements of preparation and crafting of sermon content.
  3. Grasp and apply elements of nonverbal communication in preaching.
  4. Sample a variety of preachers from the past and present.
  5. Develop an individual preaching style that fits one’s own personality and abilities.

Biblical Interpretation I (4 credits)

This course explores Scripture in its original historical, cultural, and geographical context, focusing mainly on Old Testament people, places, and events. Professor Ray Vander Laan takes us to locations where biblical history unfolded and shows the relevance for contemporary cultures and people. You must complete the Old Testament Survey before taking this course.

 Outcomes:

  1. Know the history, culture, and geography that form the original setting of many Old Testament Scriptures.
  2. Appreciate how archaeology and cultural studies can enhance biblical understanding.
  3. Know more about Old Testament people, places, and events.
  4. Grow in the ability to use the original background to understand Old Testament texts and apply them to contemporary life.
  5. Understand key theological themes revealed in the Old Testament.

Biblical Interpretation II (4 credits)

This course looks at some major Biblical events, key persons, important Biblical archeological sites, and themes in the history of the Biblical revelation. This class tends to highlight the New Testament, but also will jump back to Old Testament characters and themes. The Articles will mainly feature New Testament topics. Our noted professor Rev. Ray Vander Laan takes us to onsite locations where Biblical history unfolded. Such a study helps us to see God’s faithfulness in the past and better to understand the church’s present challenges and opportunities. You must complete New Testament Survey before taking this course.

   Outcomes:

  1. Know the history, culture, and geography that form the original setting of many New Testament Scriptures.
  2. Appreciate how archaeology and cultural studies can enhance biblical understanding.
  3. Know more about New Testament people, places, and events.
  4. Grow in the ability to use the original background to understand New Testament texts and apply them to contemporary life.
  5. Understand key theological themes revealed in the New Testament.

Old Testament Literature, History, and Theology (3 credits)

This class examines the literature of the Old Testament with careful attention to the historical, cultural, geographical, religious, and literary elements of ancient Near Eastern societies. This course will also show the influence of Old Testament literature on the New Testament and on Western culture.

  Outcomes:

  1. Recall the basic historical context of the Old Testament (OT).
  2. Comprehend the origin and transmission of the OT text.
  3. Understand and praise God’s character and actions in history.
  4. Comprehend OT cultural issues and their relevance to postmodern culture.
  5. Analyze, interpret, and apply the meaning of OT texts from multiple perspectives.
  6. Critically evaluate and integrate your thinking with current OT research and historical and archaeological discoveries.
  7. Distill, formulate and integrate your view of God, his working with individuals/nations throughout history in the development of his kingdom in heaven and on earth.
  8. Appreciate God’s use of and interaction with human culture and the value of the various disciplines of the liberal arts as supported by the OT.
  9. Comprehend, reflect on, understand, and apply OT community and moral/ethical constructs. Embrace a worldview that includes a commitment to caring for the creation/environment and upholding basic human rights.

Old Testament Theology (3 credits)

This course reveals the continuity of Scripture, focusing on the stories of the Old Testament and how they anticipate the life and work of Christ. Part 1 summarizes the redemptive-historical story that Jesus would have learned in his youth. Part 2 develops some Old Testament themes that continue to be very important for Christian faith and life today. Both the reflections in the book and the accompanying lectures will prove useful to those preparing to lead Bible Studies or write sermons based on the Scriptures of the Old Testament.

Outcomes

  1. Be able to identify and explain the major events in the redemptive-historical story of the Old Testament. That story, after all, is a significant part of the history of what God has done and is doing for you in Jesus Christ.
  2. Gain practice in rightly reading and explaining the narratives of the Old Testament, both avoiding moralism and appreciating how these Scriptures lay a foundation for understanding the fullness of God’s reclamation of his entire Creation.
  3. Understand the continuity between the Old and New Testaments. In particular, be able to explain the significance of the Abrahamic Covenant and the Tabernacle/Temple in the Old Testament, and what they mean in light of the New Covenant under which Christians now live.
  4. Become familiar with some of the Old Testament support for biblical teachings commonly derived from the Scriptures of the New Testament—teachings on such things as the Creator/Creature distinction, rebellion against God, how God both provides an answer for sinful rebellion and actually reconciles sinners to himself, the major ways God provides to help us embrace his priorities, some significant areas in which disciples are challenged, and biblical wisdom on marriage, family, and stewardship.

Biblical Greek I (4 credits)

Greek I is the first in a sequence of three courses on basics of New Testament Greek, laying a foundation for studying the New Testament in its original language.

(Note: Greek is hard for most people. Usually, it is best to take Greek only after you have completed some other CLC classes.)

Outcomes:

  1. Learn the Greek alphabet and pronunciation.
  2. Learn how some English grammar basics correlate to Greek grammar.
  3. Learn cases and uses for first and second declension Greek nouns, adjectives, and personal pronouns.
  4. Learn inflection of present active, present middle/passive, and future Greek verbs.
  5. Learn the vocabulary of Greek words that appear most frequently in the New Testament.
  6. Learn where to access some of the most helpful online tools for studying the Greek New Testament.
  7. Learn some examples of how knowledge of Greek offers more in-depth, more accurate insight into the meaning of God’s truth in the New Testament.

Biblical Greek II (4 credits)

This is the second in a sequence of three courses on the basics of New Testament Greek, increasing the ability to study the New Testament in its original language. You must complete Greek I before taking this course.

Outcomes:

  1. Learn forms and uses of demonstrative, relative, reflexive, and reciprocal pronouns.
  2. Learn inflection and grammatical use of imperfect, aorist, future passive, contract, and perfect verbs.
  3. Learn forms and uses of present participles.
  4. Learn additional Greek vocabulary that appears frequently in the New Testament.
  5. Learn in greater depth how knowledge of Greek helps understanding of what God communicates in the New Testament.
  6. Review and refresh knowledge from Greek I and Greek II.

Biblical Greek III (4 credits)

This is the third in a sequence of three courses on the basics of New Testament Greek, completing a study of essential language knowledge and online tools for studying the New Testament in its original language. You must complete Greek II before taking this course.

Outcomes:

  1. Learn forms and uses of aorist and perfect participles.
  2. Learn inflection and grammatical use of infinitive, subjunctive, and imperative verbs.
  3. Learn the inflection of mi-verbs in their various uses.
  4. Learn various types of interrogatives.
  5. Learn numbers and comparatives.
  6. Learn more sophisticated constructions involving clauses and conjunctions.
  7. Learn some nuances of the Greek case system.
  8. Learn additional Greek vocabulary that appears frequently in the New Testament.
  9. Learn how to use online Greek tools and increase interpretive skills for an understanding of the original meaning of God’s New Testament revelation.
  10. Review and refresh knowledge from Greek I, II, and III.